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harruko:

Pink_flower.jpg
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brunze:

leahcultice:

Rasika by Colston Julian + Salt for OOB Magazine Vol. 2

f a s h i o n • b l o g
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Feelings
John Baldessari
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free-parking:

René Magritte, works from the Période vache (1947-1948)

Regarding both their motifs and their style, the works of Magritte’s Période vache do not constitute a consistent ensemble but rather present themselves as a patchwork of different pseudo-styles borrowing more or less openly from other artists and drawing on the artist’s own earlier works. These elements are transformed into something comic, trivial, or grotesque by being blended with aspects of popular visual culture. With numerous art historical references Magritte ridicules traditional cultural values and aesthetic norms and distances himself from an art scene lusting for innovation. Contrary to his “classical” works, their cool, precise and realistic approach, and the conceptual consideration behind them, the works of Magritte’s Période vache strike us as colorful, two-dimensional, quickly painted, and radiating an astounding directness and spontaneity.
With his manifesto-like protest against all varieties of arrogance and reprimands in the arts, Magritte has become a model for the artist’s triumph over the workings of an art scene that seem to be more overpowering today than they ever were. (via)
free-parking:

René Magritte, works from the Période vache (1947-1948)

Regarding both their motifs and their style, the works of Magritte’s Période vache do not constitute a consistent ensemble but rather present themselves as a patchwork of different pseudo-styles borrowing more or less openly from other artists and drawing on the artist’s own earlier works. These elements are transformed into something comic, trivial, or grotesque by being blended with aspects of popular visual culture. With numerous art historical references Magritte ridicules traditional cultural values and aesthetic norms and distances himself from an art scene lusting for innovation. Contrary to his “classical” works, their cool, precise and realistic approach, and the conceptual consideration behind them, the works of Magritte’s Période vache strike us as colorful, two-dimensional, quickly painted, and radiating an astounding directness and spontaneity.
With his manifesto-like protest against all varieties of arrogance and reprimands in the arts, Magritte has become a model for the artist’s triumph over the workings of an art scene that seem to be more overpowering today than they ever were. (via)
free-parking:

René Magritte, works from the Période vache (1947-1948)

Regarding both their motifs and their style, the works of Magritte’s Période vache do not constitute a consistent ensemble but rather present themselves as a patchwork of different pseudo-styles borrowing more or less openly from other artists and drawing on the artist’s own earlier works. These elements are transformed into something comic, trivial, or grotesque by being blended with aspects of popular visual culture. With numerous art historical references Magritte ridicules traditional cultural values and aesthetic norms and distances himself from an art scene lusting for innovation. Contrary to his “classical” works, their cool, precise and realistic approach, and the conceptual consideration behind them, the works of Magritte’s Période vache strike us as colorful, two-dimensional, quickly painted, and radiating an astounding directness and spontaneity.
With his manifesto-like protest against all varieties of arrogance and reprimands in the arts, Magritte has become a model for the artist’s triumph over the workings of an art scene that seem to be more overpowering today than they ever were. (via)
free-parking:

René Magritte, works from the Période vache (1947-1948)

Regarding both their motifs and their style, the works of Magritte’s Période vache do not constitute a consistent ensemble but rather present themselves as a patchwork of different pseudo-styles borrowing more or less openly from other artists and drawing on the artist’s own earlier works. These elements are transformed into something comic, trivial, or grotesque by being blended with aspects of popular visual culture. With numerous art historical references Magritte ridicules traditional cultural values and aesthetic norms and distances himself from an art scene lusting for innovation. Contrary to his “classical” works, their cool, precise and realistic approach, and the conceptual consideration behind them, the works of Magritte’s Période vache strike us as colorful, two-dimensional, quickly painted, and radiating an astounding directness and spontaneity.
With his manifesto-like protest against all varieties of arrogance and reprimands in the arts, Magritte has become a model for the artist’s triumph over the workings of an art scene that seem to be more overpowering today than they ever were. (via)
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artboobs:

“It’s been a lot of explaining,” Vanessa Omoregie told The Guardian when her camgirlsproject first got picked up. “Explaining that I’m not stealing pictures or pulling pictures of girls off random sites. These are real girls who want to contribute to what the project discusses.”
The submission project paired famous paintings of nude muses – Sandro Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus (1486), Amedeo Modigliani’s Nudo Sdraiato (1917) and Guerin Pierre Narcisse’s Morpheus and Iris (1811) — with overlaid crops of camgirl-style self-portraits. The project has now ended, but its influence persists, particularly in the theme of agency. Like Addie Wagenknecht and Pablo Garcia‘s Webcam Venus project, camgirlsproject simultaneously addresses the nuances of a posing, self-presenting participant of an online interaction and how provocative bodies have been used in art through history.
What is especially interesting here is Omoregie’s emphases on the agency, the consent, the fully participatory self-evaluation that is happening — all in a fun and aesthetically enjoyable context. Considering the rolling changes in today’s online culture, as the perpetrators of revenge porn and other creepy hijackers of identity are finally being punished for their crimes, it’s nice to see a project focusing on an exchange like this.
Of course, there were some issues with the project, as The Guardian pointed out: “An almost complete reflection of the subject matter of the originals, the modern day nudes are mostly pale, nearly all white, and have stereotypically ‘good’ bodies (skinny, hairless – you know the drill). Omoregie, herself a black woman, is disappointed, although she has herself participated in the project and is proactive in trying to encourage more women to join in: ‘I was hoping that women who are not usually represented by the media would see this as a way to get their voice out there,’ she says.” (Images: camgirlsproject)
http://animalnewyork.com/2014/classic-paintings-remixed-consenting-camgirls/
artboobs:

“It’s been a lot of explaining,” Vanessa Omoregie told The Guardian when her camgirlsproject first got picked up. “Explaining that I’m not stealing pictures or pulling pictures of girls off random sites. These are real girls who want to contribute to what the project discusses.”
The submission project paired famous paintings of nude muses – Sandro Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus (1486), Amedeo Modigliani’s Nudo Sdraiato (1917) and Guerin Pierre Narcisse’s Morpheus and Iris (1811) — with overlaid crops of camgirl-style self-portraits. The project has now ended, but its influence persists, particularly in the theme of agency. Like Addie Wagenknecht and Pablo Garcia‘s Webcam Venus project, camgirlsproject simultaneously addresses the nuances of a posing, self-presenting participant of an online interaction and how provocative bodies have been used in art through history.
What is especially interesting here is Omoregie’s emphases on the agency, the consent, the fully participatory self-evaluation that is happening — all in a fun and aesthetically enjoyable context. Considering the rolling changes in today’s online culture, as the perpetrators of revenge porn and other creepy hijackers of identity are finally being punished for their crimes, it’s nice to see a project focusing on an exchange like this.
Of course, there were some issues with the project, as The Guardian pointed out: “An almost complete reflection of the subject matter of the originals, the modern day nudes are mostly pale, nearly all white, and have stereotypically ‘good’ bodies (skinny, hairless – you know the drill). Omoregie, herself a black woman, is disappointed, although she has herself participated in the project and is proactive in trying to encourage more women to join in: ‘I was hoping that women who are not usually represented by the media would see this as a way to get their voice out there,’ she says.” (Images: camgirlsproject)
http://animalnewyork.com/2014/classic-paintings-remixed-consenting-camgirls/
artboobs:

“It’s been a lot of explaining,” Vanessa Omoregie told The Guardian when her camgirlsproject first got picked up. “Explaining that I’m not stealing pictures or pulling pictures of girls off random sites. These are real girls who want to contribute to what the project discusses.”
The submission project paired famous paintings of nude muses – Sandro Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus (1486), Amedeo Modigliani’s Nudo Sdraiato (1917) and Guerin Pierre Narcisse’s Morpheus and Iris (1811) — with overlaid crops of camgirl-style self-portraits. The project has now ended, but its influence persists, particularly in the theme of agency. Like Addie Wagenknecht and Pablo Garcia‘s Webcam Venus project, camgirlsproject simultaneously addresses the nuances of a posing, self-presenting participant of an online interaction and how provocative bodies have been used in art through history.
What is especially interesting here is Omoregie’s emphases on the agency, the consent, the fully participatory self-evaluation that is happening — all in a fun and aesthetically enjoyable context. Considering the rolling changes in today’s online culture, as the perpetrators of revenge porn and other creepy hijackers of identity are finally being punished for their crimes, it’s nice to see a project focusing on an exchange like this.
Of course, there were some issues with the project, as The Guardian pointed out: “An almost complete reflection of the subject matter of the originals, the modern day nudes are mostly pale, nearly all white, and have stereotypically ‘good’ bodies (skinny, hairless – you know the drill). Omoregie, herself a black woman, is disappointed, although she has herself participated in the project and is proactive in trying to encourage more women to join in: ‘I was hoping that women who are not usually represented by the media would see this as a way to get their voice out there,’ she says.” (Images: camgirlsproject)
http://animalnewyork.com/2014/classic-paintings-remixed-consenting-camgirls/
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artboobs:

Thomas Bayrle, Naked Lunch / Fire in the Wheat (wall paper), 1970-2013 Maerzverlag. Courtesy Thomas Bayrle / Hans Widauer
The IAC presents, in collaboration with WIELS Contemporary Art Centre in Brussels, Museo MADRE in Naples and the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead, the first major retrospective of German artist Thomas Bayrle in France. All-in-One brings together over two hundred works from throughout his career, from the early 1960s to his most recent pieces that were specifically produced for the Institut d’art contemporain. The exhibition All-in-One brings together a set of works spanning his important periods and showcasing the variety of techniques used by Thomas Bayrle, from his early kinetic machines to his collages, paintings, wallpapers, films, graphic output and publications; from his sculptures and utopian and dystopian architectural models to his most recent mechanical installations.
At the crossroads of Pop, Serial and Optical art, Thomas Bayrle has developed a singular visual language liaising experimentation and subversion. A major artist in Germany who has long been recognized in the international art world, Thomas Bayrle exerts an influence that has shaped an entire generation of artists, through his role as a professor at Städelschule Art School in Frankfort (from 1975 to 2002); through his work as a graphic designer, notably in the field of publishing (he cofounded Gulliver Press in 1960); and through his involvement in a number of prestigious international art exhibitions (Documenta 3, 6, and 13, the 50th Venice Biennale…).
http://i-ac.eu/en/exhibitions/24_in-situ/2014/257_ALL-IN-ONE
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apolloniasaintclair:

Apollonia Saintclair 448 - 20140107 Les portés disparus (The missing)
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rfmmsd:

Artist:
Damian Chávez

"Small work 9.25" wide"
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artistdujour:

Bat Woman (c.1890), Albert-Joseph Pénot

seeing is becoming
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sextattoosdrugs:

blvckstreet:

lustt-and-luxury:

This shit looks so dope !

BLVCKSTREET

instagram: @kmwtw
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sadhaka-universal:

Ernesto Mártir